Maine's Working Waterfront
Maine's Working Waterfront

The bridge between the ocean and our communities

The State of Maine's Working Waterfront Report

With generous support from Ram Island Foundation and Maine Community Foundation donors, the Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association was able to spend six months, from April – September 2019, visiting communities along the coast to examine the current status of infrastructure along Maine's coast.

 

This report shares information accumulated from interviews, conversations, meetings, and research to help elevate the value and attention paid to working waterfronts for commercial fishing and provide suggestions for how to protect this valuable part Maine's food system and economy. 

 

We hope it sparks new conversations and continues to shine a light on the needs of Maine’s commercial fishing communities.

Working waterfronts cover a mere 20 miles along Maine's 5,300-mile coastline yet they supply the lifeblood of many coastal communities, enriching the regional economy and sustaining cherished cultural traditions.

A healthy working waterfront is integral to a fishermen’s safety and success at sea, and losing the working waterfront would be a huge loss to Maine’s economy and way of life. Fishermen, their families, and their communities are coming together to ensure our docks, piers, and wharves don’t disappear forever. Planning and development must prioritize the fishing industry if Maine wants to continue to be the way life should be.

The Fishermen’s Association is working with communities throughout the state to preserve waterfront access and ensure fishermen’s voices are heard. We are supporting current working waterfront initiatives in Portland, Boothbay, and Harpswell and advocating for greater focus statewide on this pressing issue. 

 

 

Together, we persevere.

Working waterfronts cover a mere 25 miles along Maine's 5,300-mile coastline yet they supply the lifeblood of many coastal communities, enriching the regional economy and sustaining cherished cultural traditions.

A healthy working waterfront is integral to a fishermen’s safety and success at sea, and losing the working waterfront would be a huge loss to Maine’s economy and way of life. Fishermen, their families, and their communities are coming together to ensure our docks, piers, and wharves don’t disappear forever. Planning and development must prioritize the fishing industry if Maine wants to continue to be the way life should be.

The Fishermen’s Association is working with communities throughout the state to preserve waterfront access and ensure fishermen’s voices are heard. We are supporting current working waterfront initiatives in Portland, Boothbay, and Harpswell and advocating for greater focus statewide on this pressing issue. 

 

 

Together, we persevere.

Portland Moratorium

The city of Portland is proposing a 180-day moratorium on most non-marine development within the Waterfront Central Zone in response to fishermen's concerns about the future of the working waterfront. If adopted, the moratorium will pause non-marine development and provide time for the City to convene a stakeholder group to discuss ways in which the City can help alleviate concerns regarding development pressures. 

 Keeping the port in Portland is critical if we want to preserve Maine's fishing culture and way of life.